Site
Videos

Plumb Easy: No-Crimp Fittings Make Plumbing Your Race Car A Piece Of Cake

Racers in entry level classes are always trying to find quality components that will help them race more successfully without breaking the bank.

Racers in entry level classes are always trying to find quality components that will help them race more successfully without breaking the bank.

We’ve got to admit it: Quite often when we get excited about new products or technology making their way to racing, it’s usually aimed for the big touring classes like the Late Models or Sprint Cars.

But really, there are just as many–if not more–racers in the entry level “hobby” racing classes. And their needs for quality racing gear are just as real.

The issue, however, is while everyone has to be careful with the dollars and cents, racers in the entry level classes are typically working on the tightest budgets. We’d all love to be able to flip through the Jegs catalog and order up one of everything, but that’s really just not the reality.

One top of budgets, racers in the entry level classes–everything from import front-wheel-drives, to Mod Fours, to Pure Stocks–are usually required by the rules to run either stock or stock-replacement parts. Besides the fact that rules severely limiting the race parts you can run help keep the cars slower and, hopefully, easier to drive, there’s also the reasoning that money should be spent on tires and fuel–not expensive go-fast speed parts–so that the racers can maximize seat time and gain valuable experience.

Earl's Super Stock push-on fittings require no tools for assembly. They come in lightweight anodized aluminum in a wide variety of sizes and styles.

Earl’s Super Stock push-on fittings require no tools for assembly. They come in lightweight anodized aluminum in a wide variety of sizes and styles.

Earl’s Performance Products’ Super Stock hose and ends is becoming a popular option for these classes because they do a great job of handling the rigors of racing without breaking the bank. The Super Stock line of hoses and ends was designed to be a better option than the brass push lock type while also light weight and easy on the wallet. The hose ends are machined from aluminum alloy and anodized in either the familiar red and blue or a black hard coat. They are available in all common AN 37-degree flare configurations and with male NPT threads (as straight hose ends). The fittings are available from AN -4 all the way up to -12 size, and configurations including straight and 45, 90, 120, 150 and 180 degree angles.

The Super Stock hose ends are designed specifically to work with Earl’s Super Stock hose. They will not work with stainless braided or Teflon lined hoses. Earl’s has redesigned the Super Stock hose to be more resistant to the additives commonly being added to modern fuels. The hose is a high quality synthetic rubber reinforced by a full coverage interior braded fabric sheath.

An even better option may be Earl's cool Military Spec Type III Hard Anodized fittings. They work exactly the same as the traditional red-and-blue fittings, but the hard anodizing provides much improved protection to the aluminum fittings so that they don't get scarred up as badly in the torture chamber that is your race car.

An even better option may be Earl’s cool Military Spec Type III Hard Anodized fittings. They work exactly the same as the traditional red-and-blue fittings, but the hard anodizing provides much improved protection to the aluminum fittings so that they don’t get scarred up as badly in the torture chamber that is your race car.

The cool thing about the Super Stock line is it is designed to be used with a minimum of tools. The hose can be cut with a knife or razor blade, and the fittings simply push on and lock in place with a collar–no crimping or expensive tools needed.

Plus, the hardware to plumb an entire car is really affordable. The current street price for 10 feet of -6 AN Super Stock hose is right at 35 bucks, and a female fitting and collar to fit it will run six bucks. It’s a great compromise between super strong lightweight hose for racing and inexpensive OEM stuff that will fail on you at the worst moment.

What is “AN” Anyway?

Everybody talks about AN-sized hoses, but few really know what it all means. So we asked the folks at Earl’s to help us out with that. It turns out “AN” stands for “Army/Navy,” so that gives you a pretty good idea where this thread-sizing method came from originally. AN sizes were established by the aerospace industry for the military years ago. It is organized around the O.D. of the rigid metal tube that each size fitting was designed to work with.

The numbers assigned designate the O.D. of the tubing in 1/16-inch increments. Since tubing and hoses can be built differently, the AN size does not tell you the I.D. of the hose or how much it will flow. Each AN size number has its own standard thread size which we included in the following chart.

AN Size Hose O.D. (inch) Thread Size (SAI)
2 1/8 5/16-24
3 3/16 3/8-24
4 1/4 7/16-20
5 5/16 1/2-20
6 3/8 9/16-18
8 1/2 3/4-16
10 5/8 7/8-14
12 3/4 1 1/16-12
16 1 1 5/16-12
20 1 1/4 1 5/8-12
24 1 1/2 1 7/8-12
28 1 3/4 2 1/4-12
32 2 2 1/2-12

Plumbing your race car with the Super Stock hose system is relatively straightforward. The first step is to cut your hose to length. This can be done with a razor blade or sharp knife.

Plumbing your race car with the Super Stock hose system is relatively straightforward. The first step is to cut your hose to length. This can be done with a razor blade or sharp knife.

Slip a collar over the hose and mark the hose where it meets the collar.

Slip a collar over the hose and mark the hose where it meets the collar.

There's a reason it's called a "push-on" fitting and not a "slip-on." To help aid assembly--and make your life easier--put some lube on the inside of the hose and the barbs on the fitting.

There’s a reason it’s called a “push-on” fitting and not a “slip-on.” To help aid assembly–and make your life easier–put some lube on the inside of the hose and the barbs on the fitting.

The final step is to press the barbed end of the fitting into the hose until it bottoms out. Of course, this is easier said than done. A cool trick the Earl's staff gave us is to lightly lock the blue fitting in a vise to hold it steady and then press the hose onto the barbed end. Make sure the mark you previously made on the hose is still at the edge of the collar and hasn't been pushed out. Once you feel the hose bottom out on the end of the fitting, your assembly is ready to go.

The final step is to press the barbed end of the fitting into the hose until it bottoms out. Of course, this is easier said than done. A cool trick the Earl’s staff gave us is to lightly lock the blue fitting in a vise to hold it steady and then press the hose onto the barbed end. Make sure the mark you previously made on the hose is still at the edge of the collar and hasn’t been pushed out. Once you feel the hose bottom out on the end of the fitting, your assembly is ready to go.

The finished assembly ready to be installed on your race car.

The finished assembly ready to be installed on your race car.

 

Source
Earl’s Performance Plumbing / 866.464.6553 / holley.com


Post A Comment

Post A Comment

OneDirt Newsletter Signup